Route 66

My wife Sheri, (did I tell you she's an artist?), and our daughter Sarah took a quick trip to Amarillo as Sarah has been wanting to see Cadillac Ranch. Like a lot of people, the whole Route 66 thing intrigues me. The bizarre designs, bright colors, and offbeat "art" beckon the traveler to stop and make a photo seemingly every block in the populated areas, and couple of miles in the rural areas.  (my Adrian, TX Route 66 gallery)

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I find the challenge of photographing Route 66 is not shooting what everyone else has already shot . Here's an example, my photo of the MidPoint Cafe sign in Adrian, TX.

And here's a link to a Google search for "MidPoint Cafe sign" (opens in new window) . You'll see the major difference in the sign pictures is the color of the sky and the clouds. Yes, it's cool because it's Route 66 and Americana, but photographically boring,

There's so much more to Route 66 than what we think is there,. For that matter, different angles of the routine things or the way we post process can make a huge difference in our Route 66 (and any) photography. My point is simply, look around, get off the main road, kneel down, climb up, shoot from the side, change it up. anyone can stand there and shoot a snapshot. Take time to make a photograph.

Now, if you want to see how it's done, click on Rick Sammon's photograph of the Wigwam Village Motel from his Route 66 gallery.

This, my friends, is how you do it.

Photograph courtesy and copyright of Rick Sammon. Thank you, Rick, for letting me use the photograph. 

Photograph courtesy and copyright of Rick Sammon. Thank you, Rick, for letting me use the photograph.